http://youtu.be/MU7MuDAQ0tE
  • 09/11/2014 20:35:39
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  • Film Analysis
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  • Darren Foley

 

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES - FILM ANALYSIS 

Recently I made a video on the opening shot of Steve McQueens ‘Shame’ and discussed the significance of this opening as foreshadowing the narrtive, revealing character and a subtle introduction.

This video with Explore and contrast the Opening and Closing scenes of ‘The Place Beyond the Pines.’

Let look at this brief example of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love.

If you compare the opening image and the closing image of Punch Drunk Love, you can clearly see the affects and result of Barry's journey.

Think of the closing image as a symbol of where he has reached emotionally in the narrative.

He is closer to the audience, he is more centred, he is embraced by another person, he allows the world in through the door in the background, he is in harmony with the score as he plays on the harmonium, There is a lens flare, which is a spark visually used when Lena and Barry are together.

‘The Place Beyond the Pines’ uses a similar technquie but uses full sequences to really explain the destiny of each characte...
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  • 21/09/2014 21:58:01
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  • Film Analysis
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  • Darren Foley

 

Shame 'opening shot' film analysis 

The story of ‘Shame’ is important and tragic one, but the filmmaking choices of Steve McQueen make this a film worthy of Study and analysis.

We will be exploring the opening shot which lasts around a minute in length, but the amount of information in that subtle shot out weight its screen time.

Most of this information is evident after watching the film a few times and being aware of the themes, plot and eventually outcome for our character Brandon.

The first point to note is the heavy amount of Blue that fills the screen, Blue has been used repeatedly by David Lynch as the cinematic colour which represents ‘Secrets’

The off centred framing of the shot and use of space around brandon suggest that there was someone else in his bed, perhaps the night before and his hand position indicates his two driving forces in the film.

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  • 11/09/2014 19:28:55
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  • Film Analysis
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  • Darren Foley

Prisoners Film Analysis from MUST SEE FILMS on Vimeo.

Prisoners analysis

 

‘Pray for the best, prepare for the worst.’

 

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Introduction

 

This recurring quote throughout the film sums up the theme of the whole story.

The films is about characters relationships with god (pray) and being tested by the worst possible events, At its very core the narrative explores the question, ‘how far are you willing to go for those you love’

 

Prisoners is an intense, graphic thriller that really asked the...
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  • 11/08/2014 17:34:06
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  • Film Analysis
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  • Darren Foley

Lost in Translation - Film Analysis from MUST SEE FILMS on Vimeo.

Lost in Translation Film Analysis

 

Sofia Coppola presents an intimate and touching portarle of a two people alienated in Tokyo. This highly requested film has found its way into peoples hearts and is a favourite of mine to revisit as the filmmaker creates a relatable world and a personal adventure.

This video will explore the characters of the film and how Sofia Copllola uses cinematic technques to enhance the story.

The title of the film has two meanings for the film, Characters are literally in a forgien country and there understanding and communications are lost in translation, creating a world of excution which allows moments of sutble comedy to arise through the focus of the language barrier.

The title can also be interpretated as not being able to communicate with others no matter t...
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  • 11/08/2014 17:32:06
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  • Film Analysis
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  • Darren Foley

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